C. Kaplan

  • This volume is about understanding the relationship between deviance and selected correlates of deviance in one generation and deviance and its selected correlates in the next generation. By examining the significance of these constructs in the parental generation as part of the explanation for the same constructs in the child's generation, we contribute to an und- standing of the phenomena. This contribution, however, is quite limited in the sense that we are examining in essence bivariate relationships-the association between first-generation and second-generation phenomena- while ignoring all of the other influences on the second-generation p- nomena that do not stem from or account for the intergenerational relationship. Nevertheless, the study of intergenerational parallelism of deviance and its correlates justifiably has excited attention and resulted in a vo- minous literature greater than might have been expected for any parti- lar bivariate relationships because of the mystique surrounding ideas-cycle of violence, reproduction of culture, to name but a few-that are evoked by consideration of the association between such phenomena in one generation and the same phenomena in a successive generation.

  • This book comprises twelve illustrated, interdisciplinary essays on gender and material culture across the eighteenth century. These essays point to the many ways in which gender mediated and was shaped by the consumption and production of goods and elucidate the complex relationships between material and social practice in the period.

  • This exciting interdisciplinary volume, featuring contributions from a group of leading international scholars, reflects on the long history of representations of transatlantic slaves and slavery, encompassing a broad chronological range, from the eighteenth century to the present day.

  • A constellation of new essays on authorship, politics and history, British Women's Writing in the Long Eighteenth Century: Authorship, Politics and History presents the latest thinking about the debates raised by scholarship on gender and women's writing in the long eighteenth century. The essays highlight the ways in which women writers were key to the creation of the worlds of politics and letters in the period, reading the possibilities and limits of their engagement in those worlds as more complex and nuanced than earlier paradigms would suggest. Contributors include Norma Clarke, Janet Todd, Brian Southam , Harriet Guest, Isobel Grundy and Felicity Nussbaum. Published in association with the Chawton House Library, Hampshire - for more information, visit http://www.chawton.org/

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