Peter Lang AG, Internationaler Verlag der Wissenschaften

  • Grounded in the Lexical Constructional Model (LCM), a usage-based meaning construction model of language of recent design, this research argues that illocutionary meaning either results from filling in constructional variables such as X in the Can You XVP? construction or from affording access to abstract situational cognitive models through the metonymic activation of relevant elements of their structure. One such model is the Cost-Benefit Cognitive Model, which is incorporated into the description of pragmatic meaning and presented as lying at the core of the conventionalization process of illocutionary constructions. The inferential path based on the instantiation of the Cost-Benefit Cognitive Model determines the activation of speech act values that may become conventionalized within a linguistic community. The study determines the applicability of the analytical tools developed by the LCM for illocutionary description. The illocutionary acts selected are those proposed by the Cost-Benefit Cognitive Model as exploiting cultural principles of interaction.

  • This book received the XV Research Award of the Spanish Association of Applied Linguistics (XV Premio de Investigación de la Asociación Española de Lingüística Aplicada) 2012. The present volume bears witness to the Europewide character of the Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) enterprise by featuring contributions from researchers and teacher-educators from a range of European countries spanning the geographical expanse of the continent from east (Estonia) to west (United Kingdom) and from north (Finland) to south (Spain, Italy). More importantly, the different national contexts are characterised by diverse cultural stances and policies vis-à-vis second and foreign language learning in general and learning specific languages in particular and it is evident that such contextual factors impinge on what are identified as central concerns both in CLIL implementation and research.

  • This volume assembles a selection of papers presented at an international conference held in Pontignano, Siena, (14-16 June 2003). It discusses the concept of evaluation in academic discourse and the methodological tools most apt to investigate it. All contributions focus on a crucial dimension of academic communication: the epistemic and attitudinal assessment of content and the argumentative and metadiscourse devices used to interact with audiences of scholars or novices. The assembled contributions deal with theoretical and methodological issues including diverse academic genres ranging from written and oral texts. A report of the discussion on evaluation in academic texts concludes the volume.

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