James Fowler

  • This book presents articles at the interface of two active areas of research: classical topology and the relatively new field of geometric group theory. It includes two long survey articles, one on proofs of the Farrell-Jones conjectures, and the other on ends of spaces and groups. In 2010-2011, Ohio State University (OSU) hosted a special year in topology and geometric group theory. Over the course of the year, there were seminars, workshops, short weekend conferences, and a major conference out of which this book resulted.Four other research articles complement these surveys, making this book ideal for graduate students and established mathematicians interested in entering this area of research.

  • The second SAGES (Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic S- geons) manual was intended to be a companion piece for the successful ?rst SAGES manual, edited by Carol Scott-Connor, that was published more than 4 years ago. Originally, the goal was to concentrate on tersely covered or often ignored aspects of the preoperative preparation of the patient and the operating room as well as the postoperative care of patients undergoing minimally in- sive operations. It was also our intention to include a section for each procedure where several different port placement schemes would be presented and brie?y discussed. Unique to this manual, the impact of the patient's body habitus (short or long, narrow or wide) on port placement is also taken into account for many of the procedures. Also unique are chapters devoted to hypothermia, port wound closure, and the management of subcutaneous emphysema and abdominal wall hemorrhage caused by trocars. Naturally, the surgeon tends to focus on the technical aspects of the pro- dure, such as the operative tasks to be carried out, the order of operation, and the position of the surgeon and assistant. However, it is critical that the surgeon be aware that the CO pneumoperitoneum, far more so than laparotomy, results 2 in multiple physiologic alterations that, if not compensated for by the anest- siologist and surgeon, may endanger the patient or prevent the laparoscopic c- pletion of the procedure.

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