Saga Egmont

  • The Romance of Certain Old Clothes  Nouv.

    What can destroy sisterly love faster than a love triangle?

    "The Romance of Certain Old Clothes" tells the story of two sisters: Viola and Perdita, described as equally beautiful. Both women fall in love with Mr. Arthur Lloyd, who then must choose between them. The sisters vow not to be angry at his choice but after Lloyd chooses Perdita, Viola falls into jealousy and depression. Discover what is she ready to do to win the man of her heart in this story of dramatic rivalry.



    Henry James (1843 - 1916) is regarded one of the greatest novelists in the English language. Born in the United States, but mainly living and working in Europe, he was largely occupied with the clash of personalities and cultures between the Old World and the New World. He explored this topic in his famous novels 'The Portrait of a Lady' and 'The Wings of the Dove'. James was thrice nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature.

  • A Service of Love Nouv.

    Love, art, ambitions and sacrifices. O. Henry's "A Service of Love" tells the story of the artist Joe and the pianist Delia who fall in love with each other. They marry and although everything seem to go according to their plans and expectations, things start to fall apart.
    Can money separate people who love each other? Will they get out of the web of lies that they have self weaved? Will they stay together or the burden they have to carry is too heavy?



    William Sidney Porter (1862-1919), known simply as O. Henry, was a prolific American author of humorous literary pieces. His fame came exceptionally quickly and he became a bestselling author of short story collections, among the most famous being "Cabbages and Kings", "The Voice of the City", and "Strictly Business." As a result of the outstanding literature legacy that O. Henry left behind, there is an American annual award after his name, given to exceptional short stories.

  • The Sphinx Without a Secret Nouv.

    "Please, speak softly, we might be overheard,"
    Two college friends run into each other in Paris and one tells the other of a mysterious woman he's been seeing. She sets appointments to meet him and doesn't show up, and she asks him not to write her at her home address but gives him an alias name and address instead. As the tension builds, the friends start to suspect that maybe the real mystery is that there isn't a mystery at all.
    The Sphinx Without a Secret suggests that the thrill of the chase will always end in disappointment when it comes to love, because sooner or later the chase must end. With charm and a great understanding of the human condition, Oscar Wilde more than succeeds with this suspenseful Sherlock Holmes-like mystery.



    Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) was an Irish playwright, novelist, essayist, and poet, famous for `The Picture of Dorian Gray' and `The Importance of Being Earnest' to name a couple. He was believed to be a homosexual and met a lot of resistance in his life on that account. He died in Paris at the age of 46.

  • Tales of the Alhambra Nouv.

    The famous Alhambra Palace in Granada, Spain, served as the major influence for this collection of essays and sketches by Washington Irving. Blending history, myth, and natural descriptions, Irving's book became an indispensable attribute of the city's newsstands and boutique shops. The truthful and picturesque account of the palace, the book is often deemed responsible for the revival of interest in this masonry of old. The pages are saturated with Irving's own personal account during his stay, turning this work into a magical adventure for readers and tourists alike.



    Versatile as the subject matter of his literary oeuvre, the name of Washington Irving still echoes in the corridors of the American literary canon. Having earned special status as a man of letters in America and Europe alike, Irving's fame stems primarily from his short stories "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow". An avid biographer and historian, his influence can be felt within a vast group of American and British authors such as Nathaniel Hawthorne, E. A. Poe, Charles Dickens, and Sir Walter Scott.

  • Sketches of Young Gentlemen Nouv.

    "Out-and-out young gentlemen may be divided into two classes - those who have something to do, and those who have nothing."
    In Sketches of Young Gentlemen Charles Dickens presents this list of types of men that young ladies might encounter in society; a sort of Buzzfeed article of the 19th century. How's about The Censorious Young Gentlemen, who expresses all opinions "with a dubious sneer, accompanied with a half smile"? No? Maybe The Poetical Young Gentleman, who "is lounging on a sofa with his eyes fixed upon the ceiling" then? or maybe The Domestic Young Gentleman, "who lives at home with his mother"?
    Dickens isn't too impressed with these bachelors and doesn't think the ladies should be either. Sketches of Young Gentlemen is an excellent and quick read, just as amusing as it is accurate.



    Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was an English author, social critic, and philanthropist. Much of his writing first appeared in small instalments in magazines and was widely popular. Among his most famous novels are Oliver Twist (1839), David Copperfield (1850), and Great Expectations (1861).

  • Dickens' Stories About Children Every Child Can Read Nouv.

    "It is because I think so much of warm and sensitive hearts, that I would spare them from being wounded."
    In this wonderful compilation of classic Charles Dickens stories, the adventures surrounding children have been taken out of their contexts and presented on their own. Dickens' Stories About Children Every Child Can Read is therefore, as the title suggest, a great introduction for children or anyone new to Dickens. The book contains famous stories like The Christmas Carol, Great Expectations and Oliver Twist as well as a handful lesser known but equally great and informative.



    Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was an English author, social critic, and philanthropist. Much of his writing first appeared in small instalments in magazines and was widely popular. Among his most famous novels are Oliver Twist (1839), David Copperfield (1850), and Great Expectations (1861).

  • The Wreck of the Golden Mary Nouv.

    "Remember to the last, that while there is life there is hope."
    Onboard the ship The Golden Mary we meet a dignified woman in black, a man who wants to try his luck in the gold rush in California, a mother and her daughter heading to meet the father, and of course Captain Ravender, a great believer in duty before self. When the ship is struck by an iceberg and sinks, the crew and passengers are moved to lifeboats. But they are still far from safety.
    Like in the 1997 movie about the Titanic starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet, The Wreck of the Golden Mary lets us get well-invested in its passengers before things start to derail. It's an emotional and bleak story at times, but one little girl represents a glimmer of hope for the passengers and for the reader that will make it all worth it.



    Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was an English author, social critic, and philanthropist. Much of his writing first appeared in small instalments in magazines and was widely popular. Among his most famous novels are Oliver Twist (1839), David Copperfield (1850), and Great Expectations (1861).

  • The Hound Nouv.

    Anglais The Hound

    H. P. Lovecraft

    There are graves that should have never been opened... The narrator and his friend learn this only after they have robbed several graves and started an exhibition on the artifacts they have found.

    Everything started when they were robbing a grave in an old Dutch cemetery. While they were digging, they heard a strange voice - as if a giant hound was howling somewhere near. They didn't care and robbed the grave anyway. Soon terrible things started to happen - a friend of theirs got attacked by a large, strange animal.

    `The Hound' is a terrifying short story by H.P. Lovecraft. It was first published in 1924.



    H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937) was an American horror writer. His best known works include `The Call of Cthulhu' and `the Mountains of Madness'. Most of his work was originally published in pulp magazines, and Lovecraft rose into fame only after his death at the age of 46. He has had a great influence in both horror and science fiction genres.

  • The Doom That Came to Sarnath Nouv.

    More than 10 000 years ago something terrible happened in the land of Mnar. Shepherd people built a new city called Sarnath. But the land they took to themselves was not uninhabited - there was a strange race living in the area, and they even had their own town called Ib.

    The people of Sarnath decided to destroy the other race. But they didn't know that one day these creatures would return and have their revenge...



    H.P. Lovecraft (1890-1937) was an American horror writer. His best known works include `The Call of Cthulhu' and `the Mountains of Madness'. Most of his work was originally published in pulp magazines, and Lovecraft rose into fame only after his death at the age of 46. He has had a great influence in both horror and science fiction genres.

  • Tom Tiddler's Ground Nouv.

    "The village street was like most other village streets: wide for its height, silent for its size, and drowsy in the dullest degree."
    In Tom Tiddlers Ground - the name of an ancient children's game - Dickens introduces us to a hermit named Mr. Mopes. An interesting and reflective story, it talks about solitude and how different people respond to it.



    Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was an English author, social critic, and philanthropist. Much of his writing first appeared in small instalments in magazines and was widely popular. Among his most famous novels are Oliver Twist (1839), David Copperfield (1850), and Great Expectations (1861).

  • The Uncommercial Traveller Nouv.

    "No landlord is my friend and brother, no chambermaid loves me, no waiter worships me, no boots admires and envies me."
    Let the character of The Uncommercial Traveller take you on a journal through Britain, Europe and America, into pubs, workhouses and graveyards to meet tramps, lawyers and everyone in between. These sketches, which Charles Dickens wrote late in life, are based on his own travel experiences. In true Dickensian form it is apparent that his sympathies lie with the hidden underclass of Victorian England. But in between the dark and poignant stories, his wit and humour shines through as always.



    Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was an English author, social critic, and philanthropist. Much of his writing first appeared in small instalments in magazines and was widely popular. Among his most famous novels are Oliver Twist (1839), David Copperfield (1850), and Great Expectations (1861).

  • The Perils of Certain English Prisoners Nouv.

    Near the English colony of Belize, a silver mine is attacked by pirates. They murder a number of the British colonist and take the rest hostage. When all hope seems lost, the colonists' survival is suddenly down to a couple of remarkable and brave imprisoned English women.
    Co-written by Dickens' friend Wilkie Collins, The Perils of Certain English Prison is a thrilling adventure novel filled with murder, intrigue and strong female characters. Told in the first person and with the same sense of adventure, the novel is similar in style to Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe.



    Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was an English author, social critic, and philanthropist. Much of his writing first appeared in small instalments in magazines and was widely popular. Among his most famous novels are Oliver Twist (1839), David Copperfield (1850), and Great Expectations (1861).

  • The Mudfog Papers Nouv.

    "The total number of legs belonging to the manufacturing population of one great town in Yorkshire was, in round numbers, forty thousand, while the total number of chair and stool legs in their houses was only thirty thousand (...) Ten thousand individuals were either destitute of any rest for their legs at all, or passed the whole of their leisure time sitting upon boxes."
    The Mudfog Papers is a collection of sketches about the very local politics of the town of Mudfog (originally the hometown of Oliver Twist). Follow the shenanigans of its crazy mayor and sit in on the meetings of the Society for the Advancement of Everything. The Mudfog Papers is Dickensian satire at its best.


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    Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was an English author, social critic, and philanthropist. Much of his writing first appeared in small instalments in magazines and was widely popular. Among his most famous novels are Oliver Twist (1839), David Copperfield (1850), and Great Expectations (1861).

  • Somebody's Luggage Nouv.

    "When I began to settle down in this right-principled and well-conducted House, I noticed, under the bed in No. 24 B (which it is up an angle off the staircase, and usually put off upon the lowly-minded), a heap of things in a corner."
    When a waiter in a hotel stumbles upon some luggage that has been left behind, he searches through it to identify its owner only to find a handful of stories instead. The writing is so good that he gets the stories published. One day, a visitor comes calling...
    Somebody's Luggage is a thoroughly entertaining and cleverly written mystery, and as always with Dickens' work, the characters and places come alive on the page.



    /> Charles Dickens (1812-1870) was an English author, social critic, and philanthropist. Much of his writing first appeared in small instalments in magazines and was widely popular. Among his most famous novels are Oliver Twist (1839), David Copperfield (1850), and Great Expectations (1861).

  • The Queen of Spades Nouv.

    "The Queen of Spades" is a short story that explores the sins of gambling and the bottomless greed of man. When an officer learns that there is a woman who holds the key to always winning at cards, he almost sells his soul to the Devil. The following actions reveal the secret to him, but at a horrifying price. The story is Pushkin's probing into human wickedness and how often our greatest desires spell our greatest downfall. A well-paced, supernatural story that keeps you hooked till the last page - and then winks at you for man's greed knows no end.



    Deservedly labelled "the best Russian poet", Pushkin's short life (1799-1837) did not prevent him from ushering Russian literature into its modern era. A master of the vernacular language and multifarious and vivid writing style, Pushkin's oeuvre was of great influence to a whole legion of Russian writers and literary styles. Among his best-known works are the narrative poems "Ruslan and Ludmila" and "Eugene Onegin", the drama "Boris Godunov", several novels, short stories, and fairy tales.

  • The Bakchesarian Fountain Nouv.

    In 1820, Pushkin visited the famous Fountain of Tears in Crimea, where he read about the ancient Crimean khans and rulers. Shrouded in secrets and legends, the ancient building impressed the young poet so much that he decided to write a poem about it. The resulting tale is a sad and tragic outcome of the sharp contradictions between the characters' expectations in the Khan's palace. Reality and dreams cannot coexist, and everyone has to pay a bitter price for their cherished desires. A profound and historically thrilling poem that is definitely worth its reading.



    Deservedly labelled "the best Russian poet", Pushkin's short life (1799-1837) did not prevent him from ushering Russian literature into its modern era. A master of the vernacular language and multifarious and vivid writing style, Pushkin's oeuvre was of great influence to a whole legion of Russian writers and literary styles. Among his best-known works are the narrative poems "Ruslan and Ludmila" and "Eugene Onegin", the drama "Boris Godunov", several novels, short stories, and fairy tales.

  • Family Happiness Nouv.

    "Family Happiness" is a relationship novel which tells the story of the seventeen-year-old Mashechka and the thirty-six-year-old Sergey. Their passionate love leads to marriage but only after it, do they find out what the other one really desires in life. Sergey seeks the seclusion in the country while his wife is dreaming of excitement and movement in the pretentious upper class society. Is the intense love between them going to stand the test of time or it is going to turn into alienation and courteous friendship? The author of "Family Happiness" Leo Tolstoy paints a realistic psychological portrait of the emotional evolution in a relationship between two people with different visions of life. The novel is first published in 1859 and is also adapted to stage in Moscow.



    Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) was a Russian author, a master of realistic fiction and one of the world's greatest novelists. Tolstoy's major works include "War and Peace" (1865-69) and "Anna Karenina" (1875-77), two of the greatest novels of all time and pinnacles of realist fiction. Beyond novels, he wrote many short stories and later in life also essays and plays.

  • A Hero of Our Time Nouv.

    A typical Byronic-hero novel, Lermontov's protagonist bombards the reader with his bipolar behavior: both sensitive and cynical, his extreme arrogance borders on deep melancholy. An existential dreamer and contemplator of the futility of life, Pechorin's free will inevitably leads him to disaster. And hand in hand with the beautiful natural descriptions, "A Hero of Our Time" is a book that never stops providing, even when one has reached its end. It was highly praised by the other great names in Russian literature - Leo Tolstoy, Fyodor Dostoevsky, and Anton Chekhov.



    Often labelled the most important Russian poet after Alexander Pushkin, Mikhail Lermontov was also a painter, often praised for his naturalist depictions of Caucasus. He died in a duel (just like Pushkin) at the early age of 26, but that did not thwart his poetic endeavours. Despite his naturalistic poetic grandeour, Lermontov's best-known novel "A Hero of Our Time" is one of the founding works of Russian prose. Among his poems, "Demon" and "The Death of the Poet" occupy a central place in his work. His interests also included folklore, history, and patriotism.

  • The Belkin Tales Nouv.

    The short story collection "The Belkin Tales" consists of five unrelated stories told by various narrators to a landowner who has recently died. Ivan Belkin, the landowner, was a strange and mysterious man, who indulged in the collection of stories. Here, Pushkin has included military figures, rich businessmen and ordinary people, who find themselves in extraordinary situations. The Belkin Prize is also the most prestigious award for short fiction in Russia. The stories included are the autobiographically-themed "The Shot", the disastrous "The Blizzard", the delusional raving in "The Undertaker", the tragic tale of "The Station Master", and the deceptive "The Squire's Daughter".



    Deservedly labelled "the best Russian poet", Pushkin's short life (1799-1837) did not prevent him from ushering Russian literature into its modern era. A master of the vernacular language and multifarious and vivid writing style, Pushkin's oeuvre was of great influence to a whole legion of Russian writers and literary styles. Among his best-known works are the narrative poems "Ruslan and Ludmila" and "Eugene Onegin", the drama "Boris Godunov", several novels, short stories, and fairy tales.

  • The Undertaker Nouv.

    "The Undertaker" is a supernatural gothic tale by Pushkin, which features Adrian Prokhorov, an undertaker, who comes to a new place. He is a very straight-forward man, and does not tolerate deviation from the norm. He is then invited to a wedding by his neighbours, where a lot of drinking is spent. The supernatural is just round the corner when a mishandled toast is proposed. The picturesque depiction of the danse macabre/walking-dead midnight party is exceptional, and Pushkin succeeds in portraying the horrifying aspect completely. A chilling story with a surprise ending that is not to be read after dark.



    Deservedly labelled "the best Russian poet", Pushkin's short life (1799-1837) did not prevent him from ushering Russian literature into its modern era. A master of the vernacular language and multifarious and vivid writing style, Pushkin's oeuvre was of great influence to a whole legion of Russian writers and literary styles. Among his best-known works are the narrative poems "Ruslan and Ludmila" and "Eugene Onegin", the drama "Boris Godunov", several novels, short stories, and fairy tales.

  • De landverhuizers in Canada (1844) is een kinderboek. Het verhaal is gesitueerd in de wildernis van Zuid-Canada in de jaren 90 van de 18e eeuw, toen het Upper Canada heette en onderdeel van het Britse Koninkrijk was. Het boek verhaalt de avonturen van een immigrantenfamilie die voor een aanzienlijke periode bij het Ontariomeer blijven wonen, ondanks de moeilijkheden die ze ervaren wat betreft het weer, bosbranden, de vijandige inheemse bevolking en wilde dieren. De familie, de Campbells, wordt geholpen door een excentrieke doch behulpzame jager Malachi Bone, die de jonge Percival uit de handen van de indianen bevrijdt.

  • De sprookjes van de gebroeders Grimm, voor het eerst gepubliceerd onder de titel Kinder- und Hausmärchen (1812-1822), is een verzameling sprookjes. De eerste editie bevatte 86 verhalen, de zevende en laatste 221. De eerste edities van de sprookjes van de gebroeders Grimm konden rekenen op felle kritiek vanwege hun kindonvriendelijke inhoud terwijl ze kinderverhalen werden genoemd. Veranderingen volgden. De kwaadaardige moeders van Sneeuwwitje en Hans en Grietje werden bijvoorbeeld later stiefmoeders. De verhalen moesten vrij zijn van seksuele connotaties, dus werd bijvoorbeeld de scene verwijderd waarin Repelsteeltje haar zwangerschap onthult als ze aan moeder Gothel vraagt waarom haar jurk steeds strakker rond haar buik komt te zitten. Toch werd de mate van geweld, die al behoorlijk was, alleen maar erger, in het bijzonder als het kwaderikken betrof.



    De gebroeders Grimm waren de Duitse broers en taalkundigen Jacob Ludwig Karl Grimm en Wilhelm Karl Grimm. Jacob (1785 1863) was hoogleraar taalkunde in Gttingen en later in Berlijn. Hij verrichtte baanbrekend onderzoek in onder andere de lexicografie, mythologie en sprookjes. Wilhelm (1786 1859), ook hoogleraar taalkunde in Gttingen en later in Berlijn, idem. Samen met zeven andere hoogleraren als Gttinger Sieben protesteerden zij tegen de afschaffing van de liberale grondwet, waardoor ze werden ontslagen. Later werden de gebroeders Grimm aangesteld door de Pruisische koning Frederik Willem IV als hoogleraar in Berlijn. Samen verzamelden ze Duitse volksverhalen, die zij publiceerden onder de titel Kinder- und Hausmärchen (1812-1822). In 1852 begonnen zij met het Deutsches Wrterbuch, dat echter pas voltooid werd in 1961. Verder ontdekte Jacob Grimm de wetmatigheid in de verschuiving van medeklinkers in de Indo-Europese talen, de eerste Germaanse klankverschuiving, bekend als de wet van Grimm.

  • Deze roman van Lagerlöf is gebaseerd op een waargebeurd voorval. Op 15 februari 1586 was in de pastorie in Solberga, Zweden, een zekere heer Arne vermoord. De oude, rijke priester Arne van de roman treft hetzelfde lot. Op een nacht worden Arne, zijn familie en zijn huishouding overvallen door een groep Schotse huursoldaten die uit zijn op geld. Zij vermoorden iedereen en steken het huis in brand. Arnes jongste pleegdochter Elsalill heeft zich echter verstopt en leeft nog. Een van de eerste mensen die na het ongeluk ter plaatse is, is Torarin, een arme visser uit Marstrand. Hij vindt Elsalill en neemt haar mee naar Marstrand om bij hem en zijn moeder te komen wonen. Daar wordt Elsalill verliefd op de soldaat sir Archie, zonder te weten dat hij medeplichtig is aan de moord op haar familie...

  • Charlotte Löwensköld (1925) is het tweede deel van de Ring-trilogie die begint met Löwensköldska ringen (1925) en eindigt met Anna Svärd (1928). Zoals in het eerste deel duidelijk werd, rust er een vloek op de Löwensköld-familie. Charlotte Löwensköld gaat over de volgende generaties Löwensköld, een psychologisch diepgaand verhaal dat niet verstoken is van sociaal commentaar, met als hoofdmoot een moeilijke moeder-zoonverhouding. Dan is er nog de liefde van Charlotte voor Karl-Arthur, die beiden Löwensköld bloed hebben. Maar zij worden uit elkaar gedreven; ieder trouwt met een ander.

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