• Le but, c'est de prendre un civil et de le convaincre que, soldat, il devient quelque chose d'autre, quelque chose de plus et de mieux que tout ce à quoi peut aspirer un civil. Maintenant, tu as le privilège de faire partie de nous. Maintenant, une partie de toi pourra disparaître dans la tombe du Soldat inconnu. Comment? Grâce à l'uniforme, grâce au fusil. Pendant un été, il n'existera plus rien que l'honneur de t'effacer dans l'arme et le costume qui vient avec. Le temps d'un cours, tu n'auras besoin de rien, tu ne demanderas rien, silencieux, anonyme, inébranlable et prêt à obéir aux ordres, car les ordres proviennent de la Reine en passant par le ministre de la Défense, le peuple canadien et ultimement ta famille, dont tu es le héros. Maintenant, ta plus grande dignité, c'est le sacrifice de ta personne pour le service. Ce sacrifice, c'est pour les autres que tu le fais, c'est pour eux que tu portes cet uniforme, et c'est en leur nom que tu tireras chacune des balles de ce fusil.

  • Anglais For Today I Am a Boy

    Kim Fu

    Long-listed for the 2014 Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize A Barnes & Noble Discover Great New Writers Spring 2014 selection A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice Sensitively wrought . . . For Today I Am a Boy is as much about the construction of self as the consequences of its unwitting destruction--and what happens when its acceptance seems as foreign as another country. --New York Times Book Review Subtle and controlled, with flashes of humor and warmth. --Slate At birth, Peter Huang is given the Chinese name Juan Chaun, powerful king. To his parents, newly settled in small-town Ontario, he is the exalted only son in a sea of daughters, the one who will finally fulfill his immigrant fathers dreams of Western masculinity. Peter and his sisters grow up in an airless house of order and obligation, though secrets and half-truths simmer beneath the surface. At the first opportunity, each of the girls lights out on her own. But for Peter, escape is not as simple as fleeing his parents home. Though his father crowned him powerful king, Peter knows otherwise. He knows he is really a girl. With the help of his far-flung sisters and the sympathetic souls he finds along the way, Peter inches ever closer to his own life, his own skin, in this darkly funny, emotionally acute, stunningly powerful debut. Keeps you reading. Told in snatches of memory that hurt so much they have the ring of truth. --Bust magazine

  • Anglais Drift

    Victoria Patterson

    Welcome to Newport Beach, California--a community often found glittering in the spotlight, but one that isn't always as glamorous as we imagine. Through the lives of waiters and waitresses, divorced and single parents, and alienated teens, Victoria Patterson's Drift offers a rare and rewarding view into the real life of this nearly mythical place, all the while plumbing the depths of female friendship and what it means to be an outsider. Fresh, energetic, deceptively powerful and delightfully frank, hers is a voice you won't be able to stop reading.

  • Anglais Kingbird Highway

    Kenn Kaufman

    Now revered as one of North America's top birders, Kenn Kaufman hit the road at age sixteen and spent a year crisscrossing the country to see as many birds as he could, in a birding competition known as a "big year." In what has become a classic among birders, this memoir chronicles the subculture of birding in the 1970s and a teenager's search for his place in the world. In a new afterword, Kaufman looks at the evolution of bird-listing since his own big year.

  • Amitav Ghosh's extraordinary first novel makes a claim on literary turf held by Gabriel García Márquez and Salman Rushdie. In a vivid and magical story, The Circle of Reason traces the misadventures of Alu, a young master weaver in a small Bengali village who is falsely accused of terrorism. Alu flees his home, traveling through Bombay to the Persian Gulf to North Africa with a bird-watching policeman in pursuit.

  • In an Ivory Coast village where Christians and Muslims are squaring off for war, against a backdrop of bloody conflict and vibrant African life, Jack Diaz an American relief worker and Mamadou, his village guardian, learn that hate knows no color and that true heroism waits where we least expect it.During lulls in the violence, Jack learns the cycles of Africa of hunting in the rain forest, cultivating the yam, and navigating the nuances of the language; of witchcraft, storytelling, and chivalry. Despite the omnipresence of AIDS, he courts a stunning Peul girl, meets his neighbor's wife in the darkened forest, and desperately pursues the village flirt. Still, Jack spends many nights alone in his hut, longing for love in a place where his skin color excludes him.Brimming with dangerous passions and the pressures of life in a time of war, Whiteman is a stunning debut and a tale of desire, isolation, humor, action, and fear.

  • As much as life has irrevocably changed since the death of his father, much has stayed the same for Cam. He's always had a great deal of responsibility around the house, but the burden is heavier now in combination with the load of grief he's been carrying. After the man who was driving the truck that killed his father turns up at the end of the driveway, Cam feels pressure to keep his family safe as well. He starts to see the man everywhere: at his work, in stores, at his sister's school. Cam needs to know what the man wants from his family, and he starts following his father's killer in search of answers.

  • À la parution de son premier roman, À cause des garçons, Samuel Larochelle a fait une entrée remarquée. Danielle Laurin écrivait dans Elle Québec : « Il a 27 ans, du bagou, du talent. » Voici la suite de cette première publication, le deuxième volet des tribulations amoureuses, professionnelles et existentielles d'Émile. Ponctué d'humour et d'élans d'émotions, ce deuxième titre aborde de front le couple sous toutes ses formes et tous ses angles, en plus d'écorcher l'homophobie ambiante et notre rapport à l'image.

    Été 2012. Émile Leclair est en Asie, perdu, malade et seul. Pourtant, six mois plus tôt, à Montréal, le couple qu'il formait avec Davide était un exemple de fulgurance amoureuse capable de convertir les plus cyniques. À travers le regard du jeune Gaspésien, ses souvenirs, son intensité et ses réflexions souvent très drôles, on revisite l'année toute en montagnes russes qui a précédé ce voyage et les surprises qui ont suivi... Sa complicité avec Davide a-t-elle succombé aux obstacles placés sur leur route ? Est-il plutôt arrivé quelque chose au peintre italo-iranien, dont la carrière semblait sur le point d'éclore ? Ou est-ce le jeune photographe qui aurait perdu pied, à travers ses premiers contrats, ses projets d'expositions et ses questionnements persistants sur le regard des autres ? D'une manière ou d'une autre, Émile gagne en maturité au fil du temps et des expériences. Et comme toujours, ses proches - Lilie, Clara, Charles, Bryan et la mamma - savent l'entourer, sans se gêner pour le confronter à ses certitudes sur le couple !

  • Émile Claudel is no ordinary child. Only months after his birth, following the liberation of France in 1945, he can already chatter away in several languages, much to his mother's frustration. Nicknamed the Little Fox for his appearance, Émile is born into a loveless home, where patience is in short supply. Abandoned by his family, he struggles to find a place in society. This deftly written coming-of-age novel follows Émile on his journey toward adulthood, as his country moves away from austere conservatism and embraces the counterculture of the 1960s.

    Reviws:
    "An intriguing, masterful novel, [The Little Fox of Mayerville] shines." (Les Libraires)

    "A skillful blend of emotion, hijinks, and adventure, all delivered in lively, imaginative language." (Marie-Michèle Giguère, Lettres québécoises)

    "The polished prose keeps readers on their toes right to the end." (Mario Cloutier, La Presse

    Excerpt
    "On the back of an old, yellowed receipt, I drew up a list of the men in the village who might have been my father. Beside each name, I gave them a score from one to ten. Ten points meant they were the man on whom all hopes were pinned, the man who stood the best chance of being my father. One day my mother found the list under my mattress and threw it away."

  • Falling to sleep has never been so tiring. Sleep climbers Jayden, Connor and Max meet in a strange, moonlit dream land where the only way to `fall' asleep is to climb. The climbing is not so simple, though. The mountain is full of night-time animals and things that could only exist in a dream world. Jayden, a brash, assertive girl, battles her own demons while joining forces with Connor, a calm, intuitive young man, and Max, a young teenager trying to be a man in a boy's body. Together, they climb their way up the mountain but their many adventures are interrupted by Richard Hatemore, an evil, sickly-looking boy who will stop at nothing to prevent them from reaching their goal. As the sleep climbers move closer to the top, they begin to work as a team and ultimately, face their greatest challenge together.

  • Laura finds out that, Ricky, the boy who created her horrible nickname, "Lard Butt," has moved back into town-and immediately schemes to keep him quiet. After all, she can't let her new swim teammates, especially drool-worthy Noah, hear the horrible name! No way! She's determined to put a million years between grade school and junior high-even in the face of a father who drives an éclair, a would-be-movie-star mother who suddenly moves back home, and a past that comes back to haunt her with the dreaded nickname. Although Laura's embarrassed about how she looks in a swimsuit, she tries to stay true to her vow to take risks. She even lets Maria talk her into going to the school dance, where she braves negotiating a truce for a quarreling couple. New friendships form, Laura's mother starts getting too domesticated for Laura's comfort, and hints of romance start to develop-or do they?

  • Laurel can't handle her new authority as editor of the yearbook, especially when it comes to Matt, the new guy at school who has her head spinning. Is she doing what's best for the yearbook, or what's best for her? Is she being unfair to Matt, or is he trying to use her? To complicate matters, her best friend's love life is falling apart, her home life is driving her crazy with parents who are frantic about their upcoming high-school reunion and a sister who has suddenly become klutz of the century. Can Laurel help her best friend, survive her chaotic household and resolve her war of words with Matt without losing at love?

  • When Jason and his friends form a garage band, they call it "No Frills" because they want to keep it real, even when they enter a band contest and pressures to alter their image mount. Then one day, due to a close encounter with lightning, Jason's life changes in a big way, but is he magically cooler or is it just his perception? As he goes from blah to cool, his head swells as he takes his fifteen minutes of fame too seriously. His too-busy mother and fortune-telling grandmother don't get through to him. Even maybe-more-than-a-friend Layla is ready to give up on Jason, especially when he starts flirting with much-older Mindy. Only a rescued kitten keeps him even remotely grounded. It isn't until he loses the friendships with the band mates he once counted on that he realizes he has a major problem, and he worries it might be too late to fix it.

  • Snowed In Together

    Ann Herrick

    What secrets are revealed when six teens get trapped at school on a Saturday? Wes and his best buds, Tony and Jeff, have enough brain power to fuel the entire sophomore class, but when it comes to their social lives, they are totally inept. So they volunteer to organize the art room on Saturday knowing three certain cheerleaders will be there for practice. Trouble is, none of the guys can come up with a plan to take advantage of the opportunity to be the only six students in the building. Then, thanks to a freak snowstorm, they're snowed in, which isn't so bad when the girls of their horniest dreams are there, too. Maybe it could give Wes the chance to make his fantasies about Ellyce come true! However, the last thing Wes expects is to be caught in a game that forces everyone to share his deepest secret. He fears if Ellyce discovers the story of his alcoholic father and abandonment by his mother, she'll never want anything to do with him.

  • Sixteen-year-old Dee and her seven-year-old brother, Eddie, have been on their own for six weeks. Their father has seemingly vanished into the baking Arizona desert. Their money is drying up and the rent is coming due, but it's a visit from a social worker and the prospect of being separated from Eddie that scares Dee enough to flee. She dupes her brother into packing up and embarking on the long road trip to Canada, their birthplace and former home. Lacking a driver's license and facing a looming interrogation at the border, Dee rations their money and food as they burn down the interstate in their ancient, decrepit car.

  • Onja Claibourn is almost fifteen. Her world is one of sage, buffalo bills, brown-eyed susans, cactus, flax, buckbrush, foxtail and orange moss-the world of the valley just beyond the family farm. Old roads twist like a game of snakes and ladders into the valley. Onja and her horse Ginger spend their summer days in exploration.
    But things begin to change when Onja discovers first an archeological dig and then the startling fact that there is a plan to dam and flood her valley. She cannot contemplate this change to the landscape she loves so much. And when she also discovers sixteen-year-old Etthen, working with the archaeologists, she begins those first faltering footsteps toward a totally unfamiliar landscape-romantic love.
    Voice of the Valley is a poetic, multi-layered, coming-of-age story inspired by the controversial flooding of Saskatchewan's Souris Valley. Onja Claibourn is a wonderfully complex and very real character-innocent, wise, shy, stubborn, playful, and caring. The other major character in the novel is the prairie landscape itself-huge sky, harsh sun, rolling hills, sweeping fields of grain.

  • Kia is sixteen and pregnant. Her world crumbles as she attempts to come to terms with the life growing inside her and what she must do. Initially convinced that abortion is her only option, Kia comes to understand that for her, the answers are not always black and white. As the pregnancy progresses, Kia discovers who her real friends are and where their loyalties lie. It is through her relationship with the elderly Grace that she learns what it means to take responsibility for one's life and the joy that can come from trusting oneself. Faced with the most difficult decision of her life, Kia learns that the path to adulthood is not the easily navigable trail she once thought, but a twisting labyrinth where every turn produces a new array of choices, and where the journey is often undertaken alone.

  • In the sequel to Discovering Emily, Emily Carr is determined to become an artist. But her parents have died, and she and her siblings are ruled by the iron-willed eldest, Dede. Dede is more concerned with decorum than with ridiculous dreams and is not averse to punishing Emily severely. In the face of such resistance, and in the conservative climate of nineteenth-century Victoria, Emily must find a way to make her dream come true.

  • In most ways, Poe is like the other kids in his school. He thinks about girls and tries to avoid too much contact with teachers. He has a loving father who helps him with his homework. But Poe has a secret, and almost every day some small act threatens to expose him. He doesn't have a phone number to give to friends. He doesn't have an address. Poe and his father are living in a tent on city land. When the city clears the land to build housing, Poe worries that they might not be able to find another site near his school. Will Poe have to expose his secret to get help for himself and his father?

  • When Josh's mother dies in a phobia-induced car crash, she leaves two questions for her grieving family: how did a snake get into her car and how do you mourn with no faith to guide you?
    Twelve-year-old Josh is left alone to find the answers. His father is building a time machine. His four-year-old brother's closest friend is a plastic Power Ranger. His psychiatrist offers nothing more than a blank journal and platitudes.
    Isolated by grief in a home where every day is pajama day, Josh makes death his research project. He tests the mourning practices of religions he doesn't believe in. He tries to mend his little brother's shattered heart. He observes, records and waits-for his life to feel normal, for his mother's death to make sense, for his father to come out of the basement.
    His observations, recorded in a series of journal entries, are funny, smart, insightful-and heartbreaking. His conclusions about the nature of love, loss, grief and the space-time continuum are nothing less than life-changing.

  • Growing up in a picturesque Newfoundland fishing village should be idyllic for sixteen-year-old Kit Ryan, but living with an alcoholic father makes Kit's day-to-day life unpredictable and almost intolerable. When the 1992 cod moratorium forces her father out of a job, the tension between Kit and her father grows. Forced to leave their rural community, the family moves to the city, where they live with Uncle Iggy, a widower with problems of his own. Immediately pegged as a "baygirl," Kit struggles to fit in, but longstanding trust issues threaten to hold her back when a boy named Elliot expresses an interest in her.

  • Aneze, a young Aboriginal girl, is left for dead after her village is ripped apart by a wife-raid; her father and brother are killed and her mother is kidnapped. Aneze is the only survivor. She renames herself Orphan Ahwak as she struggles to survive on her own, first in the forest and then in a remote world of tundra and sea-ice. She endures cold and hunger and befriends people whose customs are completely foreign to her. Through it all she remains determined to become a hunter and to find a place in an often hostile and terrifying world.

  • Dunces Anonymous

    Kate Jaimet

    Josh Johnson's mother wants him to run for class president. Josh just wants to run and hide. If only there were a club to help downtrodden eleven-year-olds escape their parents' ambitions! But since no such club exists, Josh has to invent one-he calls it Dunces Anonymous, and before he knows it, the membership is up to three.
    Magnolia and Wang help Josh lose the school presidential election, but that's just the beginning of the club's activities. Magnolia, pressured by her mom into trying out for the role of Juliet in the school's play, finds herself fending off the advances of an overly amorous Romeo. Wang's father has forced him to join the school chess club, but Wang desperately wants to take fencing lessons instead.
    As the three friends try to free Magnolia from the school play, liberate Wang from the chess club and get rid of horrible Stacey Hogarth, who has vowed to become the new president of Dunces Anonymous, they realize that they all have talents-if only their parents could see them.

  • Juggling Fire

    Joanne Bell

    Rachel's idyllic existence with her family in the remote mountain passes of northern Yukon was shattered by her father's depression, the family's relocation to "town" and her father's subsequent disappearance. Obsessed with understanding why her father never returned, Rachel hikes with her dog across mountain passes and along valleys to her childhood home. As she walks, she distracts herself from her anxiety by reinventing fairy tales remembered from her childhood. As the days pass, the imaginary quest begins to echo her own journey as she confronts danger, faces loneliness and unearths the truth about her father.

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