• At large during the most colorful period in New Orleans' history, from just after the Louisiana Purchase through the War of 1812, privateers Jean and Pierre Laffite made life hell for Spanish merchants on the Gulf. Pirates to the U.S. Navy officers who chased them, heroes to the private citizens who shopped for contraband at their well-publicized auctions, the brothers became important members of a filibustering syndicate that included lawyers, bankers, merchants, and corrupt U.S. officials. But this allegiance didn't stop the Laffites from becoming paid Spanish spies, disappearing into the fog of history after selling out their own associates.
    William C. Davis uncovers the truth about two men who made their names synonymous with piracy and intrigue on the Gulf.

  • Praise for David Kertzer and Prisoner of the Vatican:
    "Kertzer once again proves himself a truly compelling historian." -- André Aciman "Prisoner of the Vatican reads like exciting fiction. And it has astounding contemporary relevance." -- Alfred Uhry "Kertzer's careful scholarship and lucid writing make the human character of this religious institution quite clear." -- James Carroll "Fascinating." -- Entertainment Weekly "Lively . . . filled with telling anecdotes and colorful descriptions of the various characters involved in the struggle." -- America, the National Catholic Weekly "Riveting and fast-paced . . . history writing at its best." -- Publishers Weekly, starred review "[A] rousing tale . . . from a masterful, controversial scholar." -- Kirkus Reviews, starred review "A chilling and timely warning of what happens when religious power becomes synonymous with political power. If you love Italy, if you love Rome, this book is essential reading." -- John Guare "As magically spellbinding as it is enlightening, replete with colorful characters and complex international and ecclesiastical politics and intrigue. Kertzer is a national treasure and his latest book another masterpiece." -- Kevin Madigan, associate professor, Harvard Divinity School "This book is a gift to everyone who welcomes the emergence of buried history, and a boon to anyone who has ever wondered about the origins of the wonderful, tenuously unified place called modern Italy." -- Tracy Kidder David Kertzer's absorbing history presents an astonishing account of the birth of modern Italy and the clandestine politics behind the Vatican's last stand in the battle between church and the newly created Italian state. Drawing on a wealth of secret documents long buried in the Vatican archives, Kertzer reveals a fascinating story of outrageous accusations, mutual denunciations, raucous demonstrations, and secret dealings.
    When Italy's armies seized the Holy City and claimed it for the Italian capital, Pope Pius IX, outraged, retreated to the Vatican and declared himself a prisoner, calling on foreign powers to force the Italians out of Rome. The action set in motion decades of political intrigues that hinged on such fascinating characters as Garibaldi, King Viktor Emmanuel, Napoleon III, and Chancellor Bismarck. No one who reads this eye-opening book will ever think of Italy, or the Vatican, in quite the same way again.
    "A gripping account of this little-known story." -- Washington Post «A suspenseful and even captivating read . . . Kertzer illuminates one of history's darker corners." -- Providence Journal "Extraordinary . . . Kertzer describes intrigue, spying, disinformation, and public relations campaigns worthy of any contemporary spy novel." -- Seattle Times David I. Kertzer is author of several illuminating works of history, including The Popes Against the Jews and The Kidnapping of Edgardo Mortara, a National Book Award finalist. A professor of anthropology and Italian studies at Brown University, he lives in Providence, Rhode Island.

  • An invaluable guide to the art and mind of Virginia Woolf, drawn by her husband from the personal record she kept over a period of twenty-seven years. Included are entries that refer to her own writing, others that are clearly writing exercises; accounts of people and scenes relevant to the raw material of her work; and comments on books she was reading. Edited and with a Preface by Leonard Woolf; Indices.

  • Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., first revealed the sequences that governed American politics over the past two centuries in The Cycles of American History. In this updated edition, the prominent political historian continues to reflect on the "recurring struggle between pragmatism and idealism in the American soul" (Time). Faced with a new century, a new millennium, and social and technological revolutions, Schlesinger confronts the possibility of a revolution in American political cycles.

  • Anglais A Slave No More

    David W. Blight

    Slave narratives, some of the most powerful records of our past, are extremely rare, with only fifty-five post-Civil War narratives surviving. A mere handful are first-person accounts by slaves who ran away and freed themselves. Now two newly uncovered narratives, and the biographies of the men who wrote them, join that exclusive group with the publication of A Slave No More, a major new addition to the canon of American history. Handed down through family and friends, these narratives tell gripping stories of escape: Through a combination of intelligence, daring, and sheer luck, the men reached the protection of the occupying Union troops. David W. Blight magnifies the drama and significance by prefacing the narratives with each man's life history. Using a wealth of genealogical information, Blight has reconstructed their childhoods as sons of white slaveholders, their service as cooks and camp hands during the Civil War, and their climb to black working-class stability in the north, where they reunited their families. In the stories of Turnage and Washington, we find history at its most intimate, portals that offer a rich new answer to the question of how four million people moved from slavery to freedom. In A Slave No More, the untold stories of two ordinary men take their place at the heart of the American experience.

  • An absorbing look at the early beginnings of one of America's finest writers, The Mortgaged Heart is an important collection of Carson McCullers's work, including stories, essays, articles, poems, and her writing on writing. These pieces, written mostly before McCullers was nineteen, provide invaluable insight into her life and her gifts and growth as a writer. The collection also contains the working outline of "The Mute," which became her best-selling novel The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter. As new generations of readers continue to discover her work, Carson McCullers's celebrated place in American letters survives more surely than ever. Edited by McCullers's sister and with a new introduction by Joyce Carol Oates, The Mortgaged Heart will be an inspiration to writers young and old.

  • Felicity Beinfait has a problem. With no money to pay for her finishing school graduation, no dowry to attract a suitor and a tarnished lineage, it seems she will land in the gutters of London. Unwilling to face defeat she comes up with a plan to avenge her father and restore her family name. She can't seem to do anything right until she kidnaps the wrong brother and quickly finds herself unprepared for the task of holding one handsome, witty and unusual Duke hostage. Lord William Carnduff has spent his life keeping his younger wastrel of a brother from ending up destitute and has little time for fancy balls and simpering ladies. He much prefers the quiet solitude of the family hunting lodge. His plans don't include a wife, until she smacks him over the head with a skillet. Can a self-proclaimed chef and an admitted klutz mix up a batch of love, or will someone get burned before it is all done?

  • As a child, Anne Fairfield dreams of the father she never knew, the hero who died fighting the French and their Indian allies in a land across the sea. Her mother's stories, and fantasies of her own devising, sustain and nurture her through a poor and lonely existence. Until one winter night, a strange man comes to call, and the life she has known comes crashing down like shattered glass. Forced to confront sordid truths, secrets and lies, the headstrong young woman begins to learn that, like generations of Darvey women ruled by their hearts, she is destined to follow in their footsteps. Set against the backdrop of 18th century England, Lord Esterleigh's Daughter is the first book in "The Serpent's Tooth" trilogy, which follows Anne from the rural countryside, to London society and into the center of the American Revolution.

  • Robert Blake, Duke of Lear, is a man of intense emotions who loves deeply and protects fiercely. Devastated and wracked with guilt by the death of his younger brother, Stefan, in the Peninsular War, he readily agrees to aid Jane Chandler to bring her seriously wounded brother back from Portugal. Much against Jane's wishes, he decides to accompany her and together they embark on the hazardous mission to retrieve the young soldier. However, the journey holds many revelations, not least of all the abiding friendship and growing love between the two travelers. That special love is put severely to the test by the treachery that awaits them upon their return to England, when a tenant of Jane's former home invades their lives, maliciously creating jealousy and misunderstandings for his own nefarious reasons. Can their friendship and love conquer the emotions that threaten to tear them asunder or will the perpetrator emerge victorious? 

  • Disappointed in love, weary of war, Goran von Hagen retreats to his idyllic alpine estate. He does not know the dark and ancient secret of the looming mountain--or that it will change his life forever. From Artemis and Apollo to Frey and Freya, on through all known pantheons, there are magical twins, so this sparked the tale of Mina and Goran, the von Hagen's first born. "Black Magic" is Goran's tale, dealing with the ancient secrets of his home place. Threads which were part of the original Red Magic story are elaborated, especially when some very old "chickens" come home to roost, turning the lives of the brother and sister upside down. I wanted very much to link the shape-shifter experience to the prehistoric -- a.k.a. sublime -- images discovered on the walls of caves all over the world. In "Black Magic," both the horned god and the wolf man enter our reality.

  • Angelica is a Patriot heiress, stalked by a brutal, fortune-hunting British officer. She is forced to trust Jack, the mystery man who pledges to take her on a dangerous war-time journey up river to her Albany home, she expects to encounter brigands, Tories and Indians. What she doesn't expect is to lose her heart along the way.

  • Dancing Fawn

    Ginger Simpson

    Grace Cummings' family is killed and she's taken captive by a war party of young Lakota's hungry to fight the white men encroaching on their sacred black hill; land granted them in a treaty with the government. The brave responsible for leading the war party and Grace's captor is shunned by the tribe for drawing attention to their band and leaves the village, giving Grace to Little Elk, the nephew of the chief. With the help and guidance of another white woman in camp, Green Eyes, wife of the chief, Grace learns important facts about the tribe and accepts her given Lakota name, Dancing Fawn... and the love of Little Elk. While the warriors are away joining with other tribes to fight the war brought upon them by the young warriors, white soldier attack the camp, killing only women, children, and old men. Dancing Fawn is discovered, identified as a white captive and forced to return with the soldiers to Fort Sully. Tied hands and constant guarding display she's not going voluntarily. Back in civilization and under the watchful eye of the Colonel's wife, Fawn must decide where her heart truly lies.

  • Jaci Eastman believes only reality can be photographed. So how can she photograph a man who doesn't exist in her time beside a carousel horse that doesn't exist in his? When Jaci is inadvertently drawn through time to 1874 while photographing a restored carousel from that period, she lands at Wildwood horse farm and must reply on the good graces of its owner, Nicholas Westbrooke. Nicholas is a man who likes routine, but Jaci unwittingly shatters his illusions about women, passion and love. She tells stories of flying machines and teaches science to his niece. She's outrageous in her dress, manners and language, and yet he finds her irresistible. Jaci has adjusted to life in the nineteenth century and finds herself falling in love with Nicholas. But when he begins carving the exact horse that transported her through time, will she use it to return to her present, or stay and create a new reality?

  • Yellow Moon, a Lakota maiden, accompanies her family to the Sun Dance and becomes promised to a Santee warrior who'll soon be chief. While accompanying Thunder Eyes' clan back to his tribe, she and the other women are stolen by the Crow, and while in Plenty Coup's camp is told she'll become his second wife rather than be a slave. She finds friendship and help at the hands of his first wife, a Cherokee captive called Pretty Shield. When Thunder Eye's comes to rescue his betrothed, she begs him to take her newfound friend along, and the two women eventually become sisters-in-law. When the Crow come to extract their revenge, fate changes their destiny in a big way.

  • To whoever finds this journal:I started out this rainy November morning in 1988 as an archeology intern uncovering sunken treasure from the Steamboat Arabia, but due to circumstances I don't understand, at the end of the day I found myself on board the Arabia, back in 1856, the year she sank. Thus Brianna begins her journal, finding herself rescued by Jake Worth, a passenger on the Arabia; a man with secrets of his own and no desire to be responsible for another human being. But fate has thrown them together, and while Bri can't explain how she got there, she is fascinated by the fact that she is living the history she has only read about. Bri pulls Jake into the problems of the people on board almost on a daily basis and he reluctantly helps if only to keep her out of trouble. She is attracted to him, but since she wasn't on the original manifest, she fears getting involved will alter history in some way. Yet when Jake comes to her in passion she can't resist her feelings. As the steamboat paddlewheel takes them closer and closer to the fateful day when the Arabia sank, will they have a choice in their destiny?

  • Taiwan's specific situation in Asia is the source of its thorn past. Situated in the South East of China, Taiwan was at the crossroads of many maritime routes and squeezed between its neighbors, China and Japan. After centuries of foreign occupation, Taiwan has a unique history. Taiwan, Art and Civilization sheds light on Taiwan's beautiful scenery as well as its colorful history in the form of a true initiatory trip. Through magnificent illustrations, Taiwan reveals its secret beauty, its fauna and flora intertwined with its unique architecture. Home of the traditional and the modern, the gorgeous island is also the home of a very dynamic artistic scene. One thus fully grasps why the Portuguese named her Ilha Formosa, beautiful island.

  • On his sixteenth birthday Phillipe Chabot is told that his brother-in-law has hired him to be a voyageur. He will be paddling west from Montreal to Grade Portage to trade supplies with the Indians for furs. He is overjoyed and receives all the appropriate clothing from his family as birthday gifts, even a tobacco pouch. As the loaded canoe brigade gets ready to leave, his cousin, Jeanne, accepts the proposal of marriage yelled at her by the clerk who is going along to keep track of the trading. Unfortunately, disaster strikes the brigade as the men paddle the rivers, make their portages, and get onto the sometimes violent and unforgiving Lake Superior. In Montreal, the city is ravished by a fire and death is everywhere.

  • A London season is the last thing bright, beautiful Emmaline Devereux wants. Her grandfather knows he is dying and insists that she find herself a husband and secure her future. The only husband Emmaline would consider is her friend's dark and imposing brother. But Emmaline has a past that, if revealed, will undoubtedly bring disgrace to her and those with whom she associates. Dare she risk pursuing her heart's desire? 

  • Lady Serena Buxton follows her husband from England to Cold Creek, a gold mining town in northern Californian. But, when she arrives, Randolph is missing. The sheriff seems to be keeping a watchful eye on her. She cannot trust Douglas King, the mine manager, who treats her as if she is already a widow. The bank manager refuses her request for access to Randolph's account. With no husband and no money, what is a girl to do? Serena has an unsuspected and quite shocking talent. Two enterprising local ladies help Serena prepare for a public performance, but the only suitable venue in town belongs to Douglas King, a man she mistrusts but with whom she strikes a deal. The whole town turns out to see the show. The venue is packed. But who is in the crowd, watching? Will King insist on exacting his fees? And will Serena be reunited with the husband she loves?

  • 1907. A gold mining town in northern California is hardly the place for a member of the English aristocracy. When Lady Serena Buxton arrives in Cold Creek, she is shocked to find her husband, Lord Buxton, is missing. Everyone in town treats her as if she is already a widow. With no husband and no money, what is a lady to do? 1913. Lord and Lady Buxton's orderly lives are upset by Pinkerton Agent Stuart Montgomery's unexpected arrival at their estate in England. Montgomery is investigating suspicious deaths at an American aviation company. Will the Buxtons return with him to America and help him close the case? Or is this an excuse for Montgomery to renew a potentially scandalous association with Serena? 1918. Lord Randolph Buxton is fighting at the front during the closing months of World War 1. Lady Serena manages Buxton Hall which has been converted into a military hospital. When Randolph is reported missing in action, Serena is heartbroken but carries on with day-to-day duties while she awaits news of her husband. And then Randolph comes home. She married for love, but she does not know the man who returns to her. Will she be strong enough to hold together everything she most cherishes?

  • By situating the church architecture within the cultural dynamic of Montreal, the author closes a critical gap in our understanding of those decades of the British Colonial Period (1760-1860) when church buildings and their parishioners overtly marked the urban scene.

  • Ce livre aborde l'historique du développement scientifique des différents réacteurs nucléaires. This book introduces scientific and historical developments of nuclear reactors systems.

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