Wiley

  • In the new edition of this highly successful book, Malcolm Hunter and new co-author James Gibbs offer a thorough introduction to the fascinating and important field of conservation biology, focusing on what can be done to maintain biodiversity through management of ecosystems and populations. Starting with a succinct look at conservation and biodiversity, this book progresses to contend with some of the subject’s most complex topics, such as mass extinctions, ecosystem degradation, and over exploitation. Discusses social, political, and economic aspects of conservation biology. Thoroughly revised with over six hundred new references and web links to many of the organizations involved in conservation biology, striking photographs and maps. Artwork from the book is available to instructors online at www.blackwellpublishing.com/hunter and by request on CD-ROM.

  • World Without Secrets

    Richard S. Hunter

    • Wiley
    • 16 Octobre 2002

    The future of computing-the future of business
    Rapid technological innovation is moving us towards a world of ubiquitous computing-a world in which we are surrounded by smart machines that are always on, always aware, and always monitoring us. These developments will create a world virtually without secrets in which information is widely available and analyzable worldwide. This environment will certainly affect business, government, and the individual alike, dramatically affecting the way organizations and individuals interact. This book explores the implications of the coming world and suggests and explores policy options that can protect individuals and organizations from exploitation and safeguard the implicit contract between employees, businesses, and society itself. World Without Secrets casts an unflinching eye on a future we may not necessarily desire, but will experience.

  • With contributions from: Eric Blyth, Ken Daniels, Julia Feast, Robert Lee, Nina Martin, Alexina McWhinnie, Derek Morgan, Clare Murray, Sharon Pettle, Claire Potter, Jim Richards and Francoise Shenfield The separation of procreation from conception has broadened notions of parenthood and created novel dilemmas. A woman may carry a foetus derived from gametes neither or only one of which came from her or her partner; or she may carry a foetus created using in vitro fertilisation (IVF) with the purpose of handing it to two other parents one, neither or both of whom may be genetically related to the prospective child. Parents may consist of single-sex couples, only one of them genetically related to the child; the prospective mother may be past her menopause; and genetic parenthood after death is now achievable. In a world increasingly reliant on medical science, how can the argument that equates traditional with natural and novel with unnatural/unethical be justified? Should there be legislation, which is notoriously slow to change, in a field driven by dazzling new possibilities at ever faster rate; particularly when restrictions differ from country to country, so that those who can afford it travel elsewhere for their treatment of choice? Whose rights are paramount - the adults hoping to build a family or the prospective child(ren)s future well being? On what basis can apparently competing rights be regulated or adjudicated and how and to what extent can these be enforced in practice?

  • Free-living birds encounter multiple health hazards brought on by viruses, bacteria, and fungi, some which in turn can significantly impact other animal populations and human health. Newly emerging diseases and new zoonotic forms of older diseases have brought increased global attention to the health of wild bird populations. Recognition and management of these diseases is a high priority for all those involved with wildlife.
    Infectious Diseases of Wild Birds provides biologists, wildlife managers, wildlife and veterinary health professionals and students with the most comprehensive reference on infectious viral, bacterial and fungal diseases affecting wild birds. Bringing together contributions from an international team of experts, the book offers the most complete information on these diseases, their history, causative agents, significance and population impact. Focusing on more than just treatment, special emphasis is given to disease processes, recognition and epidemiology.

  • Parasitic Diseases of Wild Birds provides thorough coverage of major parasite groups affecting wild bird species. Broken into four sections covering protozoa, helminths, leeches, and arthropod parasites, this volume provides reviews of the history, disease, epizootiology, pathology, and population impacts caused by parasitic disease. Taking a unique approach that focuses on the effects of the parasites on the host, Parasitic Diseases of Wild Birds fills a unique niche in animal health literature.

  • Drawing together the work of a wide range of experts, this extremely important book provides a clear, practical account of the salient features of foodborne pathogenic microorganisms and of the particular risks that they pose to vulnerable groups of the population in hospitals, nursing and residential homes, nurseries, and in the community at large. Chapters cover the following topics:
    o Properties and importance of microorganisms that cause foodborne disease
    o Surveillance of foodborne disease
    o Occurrence of foodborne disease in healthcare settings
    o Vulnerable groups of the population
    o Provisions for food and water
    o Implementation of safety systems
    Presenting a wealth of information of great importance, this comprehensive and well-edited book is a vital resource for physicians, doctors and nurses responsible for the control of infection, clinicians, physicians, public health doctors and specialists, those responsible for catering management, microbiologists, environmental health officers, food scientists and food technologists. It is also designed to be accessible to policy makers and administrators who may not have specialist training. Libraries in all universities, research establishments and medical schools where these subjects are studied and taught should have copies of this essential work on their shelves.

empty