• This short book walks you through the process of creating mobile games using the new Android Studio IDE. Android Studio Game Development introduces you to the key tools in Android Studio and gives you the knowledge you need to develop games in Android Studio.This book takes you from installing Android Studio, through exploring the IDE to creating a new project and setting up GitHub as a VCS. You'll then be well equipped to tackle the game-development topics that make up the rest of the book. You'll learn about OpenGL ES and how to deal with polygons, before mastering image loading and sprite sheets.The final three chapters cover topics vital to successful game development: interactivity. You'll gain skills in reading user input, responding to that input with in-game movement, and detecting collisions.You'll learn: How to create projects in Android Studio How to use the SDK manager to keep your Android SDK current How to commit to and get projects from GitHub How to use OpenGL ES to load images How to react to player input How to debug your games using Android Studio Audience

    This book is for those who may be new to game development who have some experience with Android Studio IDE and Android.  To learn about Android Studio, check out Learn Android Studio IDE by Gerber and Craig (Apress).

  • A hands-on introduction to the latest release of the Android OS and the easiest Android tools for developers As the dominant mobile platform today, the Android OS is a powerful and flexible platform for mobile device. The new Android 7 release (New York Cheesecake) boasts significant new features and enhancements for both smartphone and tablet applications. This step-by-step resource takes a hands-on approach to teaching you how to create Android applications for the latest OS and the newest devices, including both smartphones and tablets. Shows you how to install, get started with, and use Android Studio 2 - the simplest Android developer tool ever for beginners Addresses how to display notifications, create rich user interfaces, and use activities and intents Reviews mastering views and menus and managing data Discusses working with SMS  Looks at packaging and publishing applications to the Android market Beginning Android Programming with Android Studio starts with the basics and goes on to provide you with everything you need to know to begin to successfully develop your own Android applications.

  • Android Game Recipes

    Jerome Dimarzio

    • Apress
    • 23 Janvier 2014

    Android game apps are typically the most popular type of Android apps in the various Google Play, Amazon Appstore and other Android app stores. So, beyond the Android game tutorials out there, what about a day-to-day handy and complete code reference for Android game developers? Android Game Recipes is your first, reliable game coding reference for today's Android game apps. This book provides easy to follow real world game code problems and solutions, including source code. This book covers code recipe solutions that are common to 2D game development problems such as designing a game menu, collision detection, moving characters, moving backgrounds and more. This book also includes how to work with player input, how to add multiple levels, how to create game graphics for different screen resolution, and how to work with device sensors. After reading and using this book, you'll have the templated code snippets, solutions and frameworks to apply to your game app design to build your game, customize it, and then sell it on the Android app stores.

  • Practical Android 4 Games Development continues your journey to becoming a hands-on Android game apps developer. This title guides you through the process of designing and developing game apps that work on both smartphones and tablets, thanks to the new Android SDK 4.0 which merges the User Interface and Experience APIs and more.

    The author, J.F. DiMarzio, has written eight books, including Android: A Programmer's Guide-the first Android book approved by Google-recently updated and translated for sale in Japan. He has an easy-to-read, concise, and logical writing style that is well suited for teaching complex technologies like the Java-based Android.
    From 2D-based casual games to 3D OpenGL-based first-person shooters, you find that learning how to create games on the fastest growing mobile platform has never been easier.

    Create 2D and 3D games for Android 4.0 phones and tablets such and the Motorola Xoom
    Build your own reusable "black box" for game development
    Easy-to-follow examples make creating the sample games a hands-on experience

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